Forum Posts

Adam Anderson
Feb 25, 2021
In PROMOTION COMMOTION
Has any artists out there tried YouTube Shorts for self promotion? I'm poking around at it, seeing if it works at all. Seemed to work to get attention from YouTube tech channel viewers at large, I'm hoping it works for art too.
YouTube Shorts for artists? content media
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Adam Anderson
Jan 31, 2021
In FAN ART
A quick, maybe 20 minute doodle between monotonous tasks to brighten the day a bit :)
Haven't seen any skeletons around here, have you? content media
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Adam Anderson
Jan 28, 2021
In COMMUNITY CHAT
Hey Alterna fanatics! After watching Pete's stream on the offical launch of the forum, it occurred to me that a lot of people aren't aware of how we handled keeping interactions online positive in the fabled 80's/90's BBS's and web forums. In so many words, we followed Netiquette. Netiquette isn't necessarily rules or law to use to wag our fingers at each other, more like general guidelines to build a positive interaction online. Whether we knew we were following netiquette or not, it came with the territory after time, trial, and error (unless you're Dan Slott, in which case you never read the memo). In my opinion, the bar to entry/ease of access to the internet has lowered to the point where there are more people online that don't follow Netiquette than do, which is where the mess you see in mainstream social media stems from. The Eternal September is real! There are a few sources online with some variations on what Netiquette is, but of what I remember from my days on Final Fantasy forums in 98-02, these are the best I've found (although I still don't think of them as rules like they list them here): https://coursedesign.colostate.edu/obj/corerulesnet.html Sick burns on Slott aside, these are generally the guidelines I've learned to live by online since first making cyber contact in my youth, you might find it useful building the best experience you can have online as well. I make my own bed, you make yours- do with it as you will. Good luck, glad to be here! In case the link goes down some day, here is what is says: Rule 1: Remember the Human When communicating electronically, whether through email, instant message, discussion post, text, or some other method, practice the Golden Rule: Do unto others as you would have others do unto you. Remember, your written words are read by real people, all deserving of respectful communication. Before you press "send" or "submit," ask yourself, "Would I be okay with this if someone else had written it?" Rule 2: Adhere to the same standards of behavior online that you follow in real life While it can be argued that standards of behavior may be different in the virtual world, they certainly should not be lower. You should do your best to act within the laws and ethical manners of society whenever you inhabit "cyberspace." Would you behave rudely to someone face-to-face? On most occasions, no. Neither should you behave this way in the virtual world. Rule 3: Know where you are in cyberspace "Netiquette varies from domain to domain." (Shea, 1994) Depending on where you are in the virtual world, the same written communication can be acceptable in one area, where it might be considered inappropriate in another. What you text to a friend may not be appropriate in an email to a classmate or colleague. Can you think of another example? Rule 4: Respect other people's time and bandwidth Electronic communication takes time: time to read and time in which to respond. Most people today lead busy lives, just like you do, and don't have time to read or respond to frivolous emails or discussion posts. As a virtual world communicator, it is your responsibility to make sure that the time spent reading your words isn't wasted. Make your written communication meaningful and to the point, without extraneous text or superfluous graphics or attachments that may take forever to download. Rule 5: Make yourself look good online One of the best things about the virtual world is the lack of judgment associated with your physical appearance, sound of your voice, or the clothes you wear (unless you post a video of yourself singing Karaoke in a clown outfit.) You will, however, be judged by the quality of your writing, so keep the following tips in mind: Always check for spelling and grammar errors Know what you're talking about and state it clearly Be pleasant and polite Rule 6: Share expert knowledge The Internet offers its users many benefits; one is the ease in which information can be shared or accessed and in fact, this "information sharing" capability is one of the reasons the Internet was founded. So in the spirit of the Internet's "founding fathers," share what you know! When you post a question and receive intelligent answers, share the results with others. Are you an expert at something? Post resources and references about your subject matter. Recently expanded your knowledge about a subject that might be of interest to others? Share that as well. Rule 7: Help keep flame wars under control What is meant by "flaming" and "flame wars?" "Flaming is what people do when they express a strongly held opinion without holding back any emotion." (Shea, 1994). As an example, think of the kinds of passionate comments you might read on a sports blog. While "flaming" is not necessarily forbidden in virtual communication, "flame wars," when two or three people exchange angry posts between one another, must be controlled or the camaraderie of the group could be compromised. Don't feed the flames; extinguish them by guiding the discussion back to a more productive direction. Rule 8: Respect other people's privacy Depending on what you are reading in the virtual world, be it an online class discussion forum, Facebook page, or an email, you may be exposed to some private or personal information that needs to be handled with care. Perhaps someone is sharing some medical news about a loved one or discussing a situation at work. What do you think would happen if this information "got into the wrong hands?" Embarrassment? Hurt feelings? Loss of a job? Just as you expect others to respect your privacy, so should you respect the privacy of others. Be sure to err on the side of caution when deciding to discuss or not to discuss virtual communication. Rule 9: Don't abuse your power Just like in face-to-face situations, there are people in cyberspace who have more "power" than others. They have more expertise in technology or they have years of experience in a particular skill or subject matter. Maybe it's you who posesses all of this knowledge and power! Just remember: knowing more than others do or having more power than others may have does not give you the right to take advantage of anyone. Think of Rule 1: Remember the human. Rule 10: Be forgiving of other people's mistakes Not everyone has the same amount of experience working in the virtual world. And not everyone knows the rules of netiquette. At some point, you will see a stupid question, read an unnecessarily long response, or encounter misspelled words; when this happens, practice kindness and forgiveness as you would hope someone would do if you had committed the same offense. If it's a minor "offense," you might want to let it slide. If you feel compelled to respond to a mistake, do so in a private email rather than a public forum. Adapted from The Core Rules of Netiquette Shea, V. (1994). Core rules of netiquette. Netiquette (Online ed., pp. 32-45). San Francisco: Albion Books.
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Adam Anderson
Jan 27, 2021
In INTRODUCTIONS
Long term comics reader and enthusiast here, IT systems administrator and occational ronin commercial artist. I have some published illustrations on the card game Wild Guns as well as a few other commercial illustrations. In the rare moment I have not managing servers I work on my own art, with grand plans to produce an opus of my greatest work before leaving the mortal coil. I'm looking forward to being a member of the Alterna REC Room and meeting all of you :) Some of my semi-recent personal work:
Greetings from me to you content media
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Adam Anderson
Jan 26, 2021
In COMMUNITY CHAT
Hey guys, gals, and ghouls, I'm looking to put together a list of creators (YouTube, Twitch, or whatever) that regularly do draw streams (it can be comic/manga/traditional artists). It is nice to have someone to draw with especially when you're in a room alone for hours on end. Any and all recommendations would be appreciated! Here are what I can think of that I'm aware of- please help me expand it! Regular Schedules Draw Streams: Rob Geronimo (Tuesday evenings) https://www.youtube.com/c/GeronimoDraws David Finch (Monday evenings) https://www.youtube.com/c/DavidFinchartist Mikey Mega Mega (every other day live) https://www.twitch.tv/mikeymegamega or https://www.youtube.com/user/mikeymegamega (stream cropped and video sped up or cut) Michael Watson (near daily) https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkH10tQdLvHnTz5tNY6Kw3A Jimmy Reyes (near daily) https://www.youtube.com/c/PAGEONECOMICS/featured Unregular Draw Streams: Frankie B. Washington https://www.youtube.com/c/FrankieBWashington (uploaded) or https://www.facebook.com/frankiebwashington (live) Ryan Winn https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDfDG48B2CVNQrOQEsRmrdQ REIQ https://www.youtube.com/c/reiqws Jim Lee https://www.youtube.com/c/JimLee Tim Von Reuden https://www.youtube.com/c/vonnart Jake Bussell https://www.youtube.com/c/JakeBussellArt Dan Fraga (Fragtober only?) https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSOv_uzWjXvTPafpiSLeZQg Ethan Van Sciver (random, seems to usually be in the dead of night) https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCp8nOGQKLpFhtoIOOUVK40g
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Adam Anderson
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